When my kids were younger, I used to take them to the Home Depot Kids Workshops every month. These workshops are free, and they allow kids to build something cool for free with their own two hands.

Home Depot workshops have included many different projects in the past. Some projects my kids have built include a toolbox, a periscope and a birdhouse.

Want to know more about these workshops and how they can benefit your family? Read on for more information.

Who Can Attend the Home Depot Kids Workshops?

These builder workshops for kids are open to kids ages 5-12 at most Home Depot locations. You may want to check with your local store if you have questions about age requirements.

Know that you will have to have an adult stay with your child for the entire duration of the workshop class. This adult can be a parent, grandparent or other guardian, but it’s not a drop-off kind of an event.

How to Sign Up for Home Depot Kids Workshops

Signing up for the Home Depot Kids Workshops is easy. All you need to do is to go online to the Home Depot website. In order to find workshops in your area you’ll need to enter in the city, state or zip code to find a store near you.

Once you choose a store, you can search their upcoming workshops. From the list of workshops, you’ll scan to the right and there will be an orange “register” button.

Click on that button, and you can register your child for the class. Registering in advance for kids’ workshops is important for two reasons:

  • First, you’ll want to be sure you’re not turned away because a class is full
  • Second, you’ll want to express your commitment to a class so it’s not cancelled due to a lack of interest

If you choose to simply drop in and register the day of class, you may run the risk of one of those two occurrences happening. So, although drop-in registrations are allowed, they do come with the risk of you not getting into the class.

And since classes are limited to “while supplies last” in many instances, you’ll want to register to be sure they have a kit set aside for your child.

Why I Love the Kids Workshops at Home Depot

There are several reasons why I brought my kids to every one of these workshops I could attend. For one, I love that these classes require parental/guardian interaction. Quality time with parents and other mentors is good for kids.

Besides being a terrific source of parent/child quality time, your kid will learn skills at these workshops that will help them throughout life.

The workshops encourage skills such as how to use a hammer and a saw. They also teach creativity and show that everything we have comes from somewhere. We live in a world of instant gratification, where almost everything is available as soon as we ask for it.

The Home Depot Kids Workshops are a way for kids to understand that everything we use is created by someone. Toys are built at factories, and food is grown in gardens. Clothes are sewn and games are assembled.

By giving your kids the experience of building things, you’re helping them understand the creative process. They’ll learn that “stuff” doesn’t just magically appear on store or restaurant shelves.

Thirdly, these free workshops are a great source of free and educational entertainment. Besides the cost of transportation to get there, the workshops don’t cost a dime.

I’d definitely recommend putting these events on your calendar if you’ve got a Home Depot location near you.

Note: Not all Home Depot locations offer the kids’ workshops. Therefore, I recommend checking with your local store before dropping in.

Learning Trade Skills is Important

My kids have really benefited from learning trade skills like the ones taught at the Home Depot kids’ workshops.

I can ask any of my four kids to fix a door handle, help me paint or make a minor home repair. And if they don’t know how, they’ll learn without hesitation.

There’s something about making things with your hands that is a huge confidence builder. In today’s world, education tends to focus more on skills of the mind than on the skills of the body.

However, both types of learning are vital to success in the world. Do your kids a favor by helping them learn to work with basic tools and supplies.

You can do this not only by attending building project workshops, but by having them help around the house too.

Ask them to tighten loose screws, change light bulbs or help you with minor projects at home. The skills they’ll learn will be invaluable.

Home Depot Has Adult Workshops Too

You may not know this, but Home Depot also offers adult workshops in a variety of learning areas. On various evenings and weekend mornings you can find free classes at your local store.

Some of the classes currently on the calendar at the Home Depot in my area include:

  • How to install vinyl plank flooring
  • How to make a wood shelf for your grilling supplies
  • Organic gardening
  • A class on installing tile blacksplash

Just as with the kids’ classes, the adult classes at Home Depot are free as well. Just be sure to register in advance to ensure yourself a spot in the classes you’re interested in.

Learning how to DIY home projects like the ones listed above can help you save money on home improvements and repairs. It can even help you save big money on home remodeling projects.

Leonardo DaVinci said “Learning is the only thing the mind never exhausts, never fears, and never regrets.”

Help yourself and your children learn something new by attending free workshops like the ones mentioned above. I’d be willing to bet you’ll be pleased with the skills you both learn.

Have you ever taken a free workshop at a home improvement store or other venue? What did you build or learn? What did you think of the overall experience? Share in the comments below.

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